Monday, August 22, 2016

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "Everything We Keep" by Kerry Lonsdale, Served with A Recipe for Zucchini & Summer Vegetable Fritters with Herbed Dipping Sauce

It's Monday again and I'm not sure how it got here so fast. A sure cure for any Monday blues is a good book paired with a tasty recipe. On today's TLC Book Tour, I'm reviewing the novel, Everything We Keep by Kerry Lonsdale and sharing a recipe for Zucchini and Summer Vegetable Fritters with a delicious creamy, herb dipping sauce inspired by the book. 


Publisher's Blurb:

Sous chef Aimee Tierney has the perfect recipe for the perfect life: marry her childhood sweetheart, raise a family, and buy out her parents’ restaurant. But when her fiancé, James Donato, vanishes in a boating accident, her well-baked future is swept out to sea. Instead of walking down the aisle on their wedding day, Aimee is at James’s funeral—a funeral that leaves her more unsettled than at peace.
 
As Aimee struggles to reconstruct her life, she delves deeper into James’s disappearance. What she uncovers is an ocean of secrets that make her question everything about the life they built together. And just below the surface is a truth that may set Aimee free…or shatter her forever.
 
A luminous debut with unexpected twists, Everything We Keep explores the devastation of loss, the euphoria of finding love again, and the pulse-racing repercussions of discovering the truth about the ones we hold dear and the lengths they will go to protect us.

Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (August 1, 2016)

My Review: 

Everything We Keep is an easy book to get swept up into. My heart immediately went to Aimee--who on the day she was set to marry her childhood sweetheart James, is instead  at the church for his funeral. After the funeral she is approached by a woman who says she has information about him and that he is alive. At first Aimee dismisses the information but a few months later, grief-stricken, struggling to move on with her life and having feelings that things might not be as they seem, she starts looking into Jame's disappearance and purported death in a boating accident in Mexico. It's at that point that the story moves from a woman overcoming loss and finding herself into a mystery-suspense novel. The secrets and twists were dark and absorbing and I found myself constantly guessing (with only partial success) what was going to happen next and where the story was going. There are some things that are not explained that well in the story and a few instances where I had to suspend at least a bit of logic and just go with the ride, but the twists and turns make that ride interesting and fun right up to the very end--which came with a bang and left me thinking about it for days after I finished the book. 

The fact that this is Kerry Lonsdale's debut novel is impressive. Her character development, pacing, and story building are excellent. I liked that this book mixed romance and drama with suspense in such a organic way. I think it will appeal to anyone who likes a well-told story that unsettles and keeps you wondering. A great pick for a beachy read or curling up on a rainy afternoon--just don't read it when you need to sleep or have responsibilities to attend to--you won't want to put it down! 

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Author Notes: Kerry Lonsdale believes life is more exciting with twists and turns, which may be why she enjoys dropping her characters into unexpected scenarios and foreign settings. She graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and is a founder of the Women’s Fiction Writers Association, an online community of authors located across the globe. She resides in Northern California with her husband, two children, and an aging golden retriever who’s convinced she’s still a puppy. Everything We Keep is Kerry’s first novel.

Connect with Kerry on her website, Facebook and Twitter

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Food Inspiration:

With Aimee being a chef and opening her own coffee shop/cafe, there was definitely some good food inspiration throughout the book--even if it wasn't the focus. Breads were Aimee's specialty and she baked them for her parent's upscale pub, The Old Irish Goat, where rosemary roasted potatoes and whiskey-glazed corned beef and lamb stew and red potatoes were on the menu. There was mention of apple pie, salad, lemonade, margaritas, lemongrass and coconut candles, casseroles, cakes and cookies, coffee cake with cinnamon and maple syrup--and sour cream to make it light and tender, a carafe of sangria and a round of passion fruit champagne shots and hard cider, stews, tarts and breads taste-tested for Aimee's Cafe menu, lemon blueberry cake with cream cheese frosting, and Thai chicken panini with mixed greens. Aimee had a passion for mixing exotic beans and coffee syrups like her Pangi Hazelnut Latte--named after the region in India where the hazelnut was produced and adapted by Ian, or the specialty lattes and mocha's she served. In Mexico there were fish tacos and a Mexican salad, burgers and fries, grilled seafood and mangoes.
 

I narrowed it down to two menu items from Aimee's Cafe--a Mediterranean omelet--'overflowing with goat cheese, brine-cured olives, and fresh fennel and dill' and her chef Mandy's zucchini fritters that Amiee's mom said were delicious. The fritters weren't given much detail but it's summer, there's plenty of zucchini about and I do love me a good fritter. I was just going to make a plain zucchini fritter but saw a Curtis Stone recipe for Summer Vegetable Fritters that added potato, carrot and onion to the zucchini and had a tasty-sounding dill sauce to accompany them. I liked that the fritters were light with nothing but veggies, egg to hold them together, salt, and pepper

I kept the fritter recipe the same but switched the dipping sauce recipe a bit--using cashew creme for a non-dairy version and adding tarragon to the dill because I love it and had it on hand.
 
 
Vegetable Fritters
Adapted From Curtis Stone via The Today Show.com
(Makes 12 Fritters)

1 russet potato, peeled
1 carrot, peeled
1 zucchini, ends trimmed
1 onion, halved and very thinly sliced
2 tsp sea salt, or to taste
2 large eggs
freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup olive oil
1 cup sour cream (I used cashew creme + 1 Tbsp lemon juice & a pinch of salt)
1/4 bunch fresh dill, leaves coarsely chopped (about 1 1/2 Tbsp) (I used 1/2 dill, 1/2 tarragon)

Using a mandoline or julienne peeler, cut the potato, carrot, and zucchini lengthwise into long spaghetti-like strips. 


Toss the potato, carrot, zucchini, onion, and 2 teaspoons of salt in a medium bowl.Let the vegetable mixture stand for 10 minutes, or until the salt has drawn out some of the moisture from the vegetables. Place the vegetables in a colander to drain the excess moisture then squeeze the vegetables between your hands to exude as much moisture as possible.

Using a fork, beat the eggs and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper in a large bowl to blend well. Add the vegetables and stir to coat with the egg. 

Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil in a large heavy sauté pan over medium-high heat. Working in batches and using about 1/4 cup of the vegetable-egg mixture for each, spoon the vegetable-egg mixture into the pan forming thin patties that are about 3-inches in diameter. Fry for 4 minutes on each side, or until the fritters are golden and crisp on the outside. Using a metal spatula, transfer the fritters to paper towels to absorb any excess oil.

Meanwhile, stir the sour cream and dill in a small bowl to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Place the fritters on a platter and serve with the sour cream-dill sauce.
 

Notes/Results: These are really simple but really delicious veggie fritters where the vegetable flavor comes through and pairs really well will the dipping sauce. I like that they are mostly vegetables with just egg to hold them together and salt and pepper for flavoring. They actually held together pretty well, especially once I followed directions and made them small, like the recipe says. ;-) The dip was really good--I liked the addition of the tarragon to the dill and using the cashew creme with a bit of lemon worked perfectly in place of the sour cream. You could also use yogurt or mayo as a substitute too. With a spiralizer and if you use your salting time wisely, you can have these tasty little fritters on the table in 30 minutes, even with the 10-minute rest time. Just get your veggies salted early and while you wait, make the dressing, beat the eggs and pre-heat the pan and oil so you are ready to go once you have squeezed all the extra water out. I spiralized all of my veggies, even the onions in just a few minutes, then used scissors to cut them into smaller lengths. You could vary the veggies--although I think the zucchini, carrot, potato and onion were a good combination. Crispy on the outside, tender insides, I would definitely make these fritters again. 


Serving Note: I think these make a great appetizer but they are slightly fragile, so I suggest serving them plated with a bit of the dipping sauce on top or having small plates available to eat them on. Served on some baby arugula, a few of them make a nice summer starter to a meal. 


Because I made them in just under 30 minutes, I am linking these fritters up at I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is Express Meals: 30 Minutes or Less! You can see what quick Curtis Stone dishes everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post. 


I'm linking up this review and recipe to the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "Everything We Keep" was provided to me by the publisher and TLC Book Tours in return for a fair and honest review. I was not compensated for this review and as always my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.


 

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Avocado, Radish & Basil Soup: Easy, Cold Summer Soup for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I'm am still in the thick of my annual summer "I don't want to cook anything" mood, which makes cold, no-cook, no-effort recipes like this Avocado, Radish & Basil Soup from Martha Stewart Living particularly appealing. With the avocado, fresh basil and radish, it tastes like summer in a cup. 


Martha Stewart Living says, "Scoop flesh from avocados and puree with water, salt, and basil in a blender until smooth. Add radishes, and pulse until chunky, about 4 times. Season with pepper. Refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour. Stir well, and garnish with julienned radish and basil leaves if desired before serving."

Avocado, Radish & Basil Soup
Adapted from Martha Stewart Living, July 2012
(Serves 4 to 5)

2 chilled avocados (7-8 oz each)
3 cups cold water
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt
1 1/2 cups basil leaves, plus more, julienned, for serving

(I added the juice of 1 lime)
3 trimmed large radishes (I used watermelon radishes)
Freshly ground pepper
Radish leaves, julienned (optional) (I added cubed avocado and julienned radish to the basil leaves for garnish) 


Scoop flesh from avocados and puree with water, salt, and basil in a blender until smooth. Add radishes, and pulse until chunky, about 4 times. Season with pepper. 

Refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour. Stir well, and garnish with julienned radish and basil leaves if desired before serving. 


Notes/Results: This is a rich and creamy soup, with great flavor for having so few ingredients. Beware of making it too far ahead because the avocado and basil will oxidize, dulling the color. For that reason and for the flavor, I added the juice of 1 lime. It really brightens up the taste and helps the soup stay a prettier green longer. The grocery store had watermelon radishes and so I bought them--liking their milder flavor and pop of bright color on top of the soup. I also added some chopped avocado as topping, to give things a nice textural contrast. This soup is quick and effortless to make and a cup satisfies with the healthy fat and flavors. I would make it again. 


We have some good friends in the Souper Sundays kitchen who shared some marvelous dishes last week--let's have a look! 


Welcome Melynda of Our Sunday Cafe joining us for the first time this week at Souper Sundays with three dishes. First up is this Avocado Caprese Salad. She says, "Tonight we enjoyed a delicious Avocado Caprese Salad. This is a bit off the path from the usual Caprese salad, but very much a delight. And because it is a freestyle salad, feel free to improvise, to please your family."


Next is her Raw Beet Salad with Ruby Grapefruit Mint Vinaigrette, Melynda says, "Not only did we enjoy this salad for dinner, I get to take the leftovers with me today for lunch. I hope you give it a try, it is refreshing and delicious."

 
Finally there is her Creamy Paprika Salad Dressing used on a simple but delicious salad. Melynda says, "This dressing seems very simple and plain, but let me tell you, it is delicious. I am sure it is the lime juice. Lime juice always makes everything just a little bit better! Break some lettuce, slice some tomatoes and drizzle on this dressing for a quick, yet delicious salad."



Tina of Squirrel Head Manor made A Simple Black Bean and Veggie Soup inspired by a novel. She says, "Today I posted my review of Justin Cronin's The Twelve and, as I try and find a representative food from books I read, this soup was a clear choice. Homemade soup and bread were mentioned when Peter visited Amy.  This seems like a cheat talking about a "recipe" for this soup as it's pretty much a toss together from bits in the fridge and pantry.



Vicki of I'd Rather Be At The Beach found a great new cookbook "101 Soups, Salads & Sandwiches" from Gooseberry Patch. She says, "Whether you’re looking for lunch recipes, side dishes, or hearty mains, you’ll love the variety in 101 Soups, Salads & Sandwiches Cookbook. ... I’ve been a fan of Gooseberry Patch for so many years so when I saw this book I couldn’t resist buying it. I love that it’s spiral bound, and the pages are easy to wipe clean if something splatters on them. This book will come in handy when I’m looking for a soup, salad, or sandwich recipe to post for Souper Sundays (soup, salads, or sandwiches) or Weekend Cooking."



Kim of Stirring the Pot made Diana Henry's Tagliata {Italian Steak Salad} and says that it is "an ultimately satisfying salad with rich and luxurious filet, fresh leafy greens, the bright pop of cherry tomatoes, and cheesy curls of Parmesan  tossed in a light and refreshing lemony garlic dressing. It's quite simply a flavor explosion! ... This is a delightful salad that hits all the right notes and is pleasing on both the eyes, and taste buds. You simply can't go wrong with this one!"

 
Thanks to everyone who joined in this week!

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.
On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).





Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "Family Tree" by Susan Wiggs, Served with a Recipe for Salted Maple Popcorn

Happy Tuesday! On today's TLC Book Tour stop, the book, combined with the humid weather has me in a wistful, autumn state of mind. Even though the storytelling spans several seasons, something about the setting of a maple farm in Vermont makes Family Tree by Susan Wiggs the perfect book for Fall, or when you are wishing for Fall weather at least. Along with my review of this fabulous new foodie novel, I am pairing it with for the perfect snack for reading, Salted Maple Popcorn, inspired by the book.


Publisher's Blurb:

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author comes a powerful, emotionally complex story of love, loss, the pain of the past—and the promise of the future.

Sometimes the greatest dream starts with the smallest element. A single cell, joining with another. And then dividing. And just like that, the world changes. Annie Rush knows how lucky she is. The producer of a popular television cooking show, she loves her handsome husband and the beautiful Los Angeles home they share. And now, she’s pregnant with their first child. But in an instant, her life is shattered. And when Annie awakes from a yearlong coma, she discovers that time isn’t the only thing she’s lost.

Grieving and wounded, Annie retreats to her old family home in Switchback, Vermont, a maple farm generations old. There, surrounded by her free-spirited brother, their divorced mother, and four young nieces and nephews, Annie slowly emerges into a world she left behind years ago: the town where she grew up, the people she knew before, the high-school boyfriend turned judge. And with the discovery of a cookbook her grandmother wrote in the distant past, Annie unearths an age-old mystery that might prove the salvation of the family farm.

Family Tree is the story of one woman’s triumph over betrayal, and how she eventually comes to terms with her past. It is the story of joys unrealized and opportunities regained. Complex, clear-eyed and big-hearted, funny, sad, and wise, it is a novel to cherish and to remember.

Hardcover: 368 pages  
Publisher: William Morrow (August 9, 2016)

My Review:

I love a good foodie novel, where the food is a part of the story--fully present and enticing, but not taking away from the the rest of the book. Family Tree is that kind of novel, the food is part of the supporting cast--adding to the pleasure of the story but, not overwhelming the other themes. This is my first Susan Wiggs book (surprising since she has 50+ of them) but I don't think it will be my last. Family Tree is about Annie, who seems to be living her dream life until an accident takes it all away. After waking from a year-long coma, Annie is initially missing many of her memories and needs to rebuild her mind, her body, her spirit and her life, so she recuperates back at her family's home and maple syrup farm in Vermont. Annie's story is told in alternating present day and flashbacks, covering her relationships with her family, her husband, and especially her first love Fletcher Wyndham. My favorite parts were of Annie in the kitchen and her memories with her grandmother. 

I don't know if the author's other books involve food but Wiggs writes it well--many of her descriptions of the food made my mouth water and the behind the scenes look at the cooking show and at the maple farm were interesting and drew me in. Family Tree is sweet, but not cloyingly so, a nice mix of romantic and family love, characters getting a second chance, growth, and finding yourself and what you want in life. It is a romance and although there are a few twists, there are no huge surprises in the way things work out, but it is a lovely journey along the way. Foodie book fans, romance lovers, and anyone who enjoys a good family drama will enjoy it. 

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Author Notes:  Susan Wiggs is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of more than fifty novels, including the beloved Lakeshore Chronicles series. Her books have been translated into two dozen languages. A Harvard graduate, Susan lives with her husband on an island in Puget Sound.
 
Find out more about Susan at her website, and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.



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Food Inspiration:

With the lead character a cook from an early age that grew up on a maple farm and also is the producer of an award-winning television cooking show, you can bet that Family Tree is full of delicious food references. Just some of them include: maple creme brûlée, Margarita pizza, scrambled eggs, pancakes with maple syrup, sandwiches of Cabot cheese grated with spring onions and radishes with mayonnaise on thick bread, applesauce, Lady Baltimore cupcakes, pan-fried brook trout, sweet corn off the stalk, chicken roasted with lemon and rosemary, apple pie, rhubarb crumple, free range turkey roasted in sage butter, homemade sweet potato hush puppies with sriracha ketchup, dressing with wild mushrooms and walnuts, garlic mashed potatoes and gravy, cranberry compote, pumpkin pie in a maple pecan shell, a duck confit sandwich with choice of Stilton or smoked cheddar, served in a brioche bun with caramelized red onions, grilled goat cheese, sweet rocket, crunchy duck scratchings, Dijon and truffle honey, Orangina soda, a rye Old-Fashioned, hen-of-the-woods mushrooms in olive oil and served over hummus, tomato tart with caramelized onions and shaved fennel, pear-and-apple compote drizzled in butterscotch sauce made with coconut milk, grappa, smoothies of chocolate and malt and maple syrup and nutmeg, iced maple bars, homemade chocolate truffles, blueberry muffins, barbecued pulled pork sliders, pasta with fresh eggs and lasagna with bechamel sauce, bread with a rosemary and salt crust, tarte tatin, drinks with homemade syrups and berry extracts, scones, chiffon cake, risotto, saffron cauliflower with fresh parsley, raspberry-almond butterhorns, jam tarts, Old-Fashioned with maple-whiskey, boxed mac-n-cheese doctored up with white wine, cherry tomatoes and basil, maple-walnut ice cream, mint martinis, tomato tart with Cabot cheese, buttery lady peas with charred onions, huckleberries drowning in Crème fraîche with Frangelico liqueur, watermelon and corn on the cob, chutney, blackberry crisp with ice cream, Ema Datshi (a Bhutanese dish of hot peppers and yak's milk cheese over red rice), iced raisin bars, homemade ricotta, and pumpkin soup with fried sage butter. Whew! I am hungry once again!


So many dishes to choose from! The book even came with a card with recipes for Frosted Maple Cookies and Cheddar Bear Soup mentioned in the book. Ultimately I went with a simple mention of Annie making a batch of salted maple popcorn both because maple syrup featured so heavily in the book and that reading about salted maple popcorn made me crave it like crazy. Normally I am a salty popcorn person, not really loving kettle corn or caramel corn all that much. But, I do adore a sweet and salty combination in just about anything and it just sounded so darn good. 

 
I looked on line and found several different recipes but the one from This Homemade Life seemed closest to what I was craving. Since it used butter, I replaced it with vegan butter as it was handy, making it a vegan treat. I used a pink and flaky Murray River Salt to garnish and drug out my air popper for the popcorn. 
 

Salted Maple Popcorn
Slightly adapted from Alison at This Homemade Life 
(Makes 5 to 6 Cups

5-6 cups popped popcorn (air-popped or stove top)
1 Tbsp vegan butter (like Earth Balance) or regular butter if desired
1/3 cup pure maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla 
your favorite flaky or coarse salt (I used this pink one)

Pop your corn using your favorite method. I use my air popper. Prepare a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

In a small saucepan melt butter over medium heat, then add maple syrup. Stir to combine, them let syrup heat until it is heated through and becomes very bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.  

Pour warm popcorn into a large bowl. Drizzle maple syrup mixture over popcorn, quickly stirring and tossing to coat. Pour popcorn onto your prepared parchment-lined baking pan and lightly sprinkle with salt. 

Allow popcorn to cool before serving. Keep stored in an airtight container--if there is any leftover!


Notes/Results: This is my new favorite--such a nice balance of buttery-sweet-salty-crunchy goodness. It is pretty darn addicting and hard to stop eating once you start. It is super easy to make too--not as much effort and not as heavy as caramel sauce--a bonus in my book. I probably could have done a better job in my pouring and stirring but honestly, I liked that there were some maple-syrup saturated pieces mixed in with the drier crunchier pieces, it made for more texture contrast. Not that salted maple popcorn is seasonal but it definitely put me in an autumn frame of mind and would pair nicely with hot apple cider or hard cider for a movie night treat. I will definitely make it again!


I'm linking up this review and recipe to the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Family Tree is my twelfth foodie book entry for the Foodies Read 2016 event. You can check out the August Foodies Read linkup, hosted by Heather at Based on a True Story, to see what everyone is reading this month. 



Note: A review copy of "Family Tree" was provided to me by the publisher and TLC Book Tours in return for a fair and honest review. I was not compensated for this review and as always my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.


 

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Curtis Stone's Tomato Consommé with Cucumber and Watermelon Balls for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

This has been the summer for cold soups with lots of warm and humid days. Anything to not have to turn on the oven or the stove makes me happy. I made Curtis Stone's Chilled Watermelon and Summer Berry Soup a couple of months ago and it was delicious, so I have had my eye on his Tomato Consommé with Cucumber and Watermelon Balls for a while now.


The Good Food Chanel says, "A deliciously refreshing chilled soup from Curtis Stone, garnished with fragrant herbs, crunchy cucumber and watermelon balls."


Tomato Consommé with Cucumber and Watermelon Balls
By Curtis Stone, via Good Food Channel.com
(Serves 4)

For the Soup:
12 plum tomatoes, chopped
2 beefsteak tomatoes, chopped
1 cucumber, peeled, de-seeded and chopped
handful of mixed herbs, (I used basil, parsley, tarragon and dill)

(I added a pinch of salt)

For the Garnish:
1 cucumber, peeled
1 thick slice of watermelon, de-seeded
sprigs of herbs, (I used basil, parsley, tarragon and dill)
extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Put the tomatoes, cucumber and herbs in a liquidiser ((blender), and blend to purée.
 

Pour into a muslin-lined sieve set over a large bowl. Push the purée through the muslin, pressing hard with the back of a wooden spoon. Leave in the fridge for 2-3 hours to chill.
 

Using a melon baller, make some neat balls of cucumber and watermelon.
 

Place a few balls in individual serving bowls, with some tiny sprigs of herbs. Ladle in the tomato consommé and drizzle with olive oil.


Notes/Results: This is a light and refreshing soup with the more savory tomato broth, herbs and cucumbers, pairing well with the sweetness of the watermelon. I did add a pinch of salt to the broth as I think it brings out more of the flavor of the tomatoes. And normally (because I am lazy) I would skip the cheesecloth step and just run it through a mesh strainer, but it does give you a nice, clear tomato broth so take the extra minutes to strain it carefully and use the cheesecloth. The watermelon and cucumber balls add fun shape and texture. If you are uninitiated into the joys of cold soups, this is a great one to start with--it's not as harsh as gazpacho can be, it's not thick like a pureed soup, it's super cooling, and it's fun to eat. It would be a great starter for a summer lunch or dinner. I will definitely make it again. 


I'll be linking my soup up at I Heart Cooking Clubs for this coming week's *Special Edition* No-Cook Challenge post where we are 'not-cooking' recipes from out current featured chef Curtis Stone or any previous IHCC chef. That means recipes where no cooking or heat is allowed. You can see what everyone made by clicking on the picture links on the post when it goes live. 

 
We have two friends in the Souper Sunday's kitchen this week sharing a salad and a soup--let's have a look! 


Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared her Quinoa Salad--Starring Roasted Corn, Pesto and Black Beans. Tina says, "This is a salad you can eat hot or cold. Do you like quinoa and black beans and roasted corn? This is for you then. As summer starts it's final countdown we are still eating light meals most of the time....But certainly we're looking forward to the heartier meals that warm us in the (oh please come on and hurry) cold weather."



Louise of Soup, Soup Glorious Soup made this Spicy Cauliflower, Turmeric and Chickpea Soup. She says, "Turmeric is having it's moment as a superfood lately. Which is fine, herbs and spices are all good for us, and tasty. Recently I tried fresh turmeric in a few recipes and so I'm still trying to get the bright orange stains out of various kitchen implements. Go the ground, I say. ... This was a fabulous soup. I really liked it, with and without sour cream. I'll be making it again. It may even enter the Hall of Fame. It's an unusual method really- par-roasting the veg and then boiling them."


Thanks to Tina and Louise for joining in this week!

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.
On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).



 
Have a happy, healthy week!